Sunday, March 07, 2010

dream! !joy truth! !soul



 e.e. cummings has been an inspiration for me since I discovered him in the ‘60s. I learned from him that one can be creative in all kinds of exciting ways, and just following the muse down unexpected paths can lead to delightfully innovative output. Well, surely the process is fun, anyway. So, I’ve been exploring other media, and finally decided to start sharing some of these pieces in addition to my photo/digital work.
Today’s share is a drawing using an image of e.e. that I Photoshopped, printed on heavy stock at 8.5’ X 11”, and wrote and drew on using a silver pen, a black Sharpie and colored pencils. The handwritten text in silver is all from 73 Poems by e.e., including the title (which also serves as the title of this entry).
Oh yeah, the book I worked from is a hard back copy my mom gave me for Christmas in 1966 after I had talked about loving his work so much. I still love him, and indeed have a bit of one of his poems here above my studio desk, reminding me to just live life fully, and not spend so much time trying to figure it out first:
in time of daffodils who know
the goal of living is to grow
forgetting why
remember how



Labels: , , ,

3 Comments:

At 11:26 AM , Blogger Mike Robertson said...

Hi, I am a choir teacher in Ohio.

We are about to begin learning a setting of a Cummings poem called "Hope Faith Life Love." The composer, in his notes says the text "Hope Faith Life Love Dream Joy Truth Soul" is taken from a longer poem but doesn't cite the poem. I have been searching to try to find the complete poem to present to my class to help give context to the piece. Unfortunately the choral work is more popular than the poem online so searches yeild the song without the poem. I even thumbed through his collected poems but couldn't find it.

When I saw it quoted on this blog post I figured I would try and see if you knew. I love the image also :)

 
At 1:25 PM , Blogger gardenpoet said...

Thank you for carrying on the tradition of examining e.e. cummings' innovative technique of expression. He can confound and inspire at the same time. The composer does seem to have taken the first four lines and the last four lines of the poem (#69 in 73 Poems, pub by Harcourt Brace & World) and jammed them together. There are 8 stanzas of 4 lines each between them. If you are interested in the whole poem, send me your email address via the link to emailing me directly (see bottom of the Oct. 4 entry, title "Auspicious Beginning."

 
At 1:19 PM , Blogger LindseyD said...

I too would really like a copy of this poem. A classmate of mine from college found it at one point, but I am unable to find the complete poem.

 

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home